Dating of the flood

"I think what people are keenly interested in is making sure that there is a point person that they can direct their comments to," said Houston's Mayor, Sylvester Turner, noting the city "has never had a chief resilience officer.

That indicates in and of itself a major commitment." But residents who have flooded say they're looking for more than that.

"We were in there, well, trapped." The storm that pummeled Hammond's modest brick home — nicknamed the "Tax Day" flood because it fell on the deadline to file federal income taxes — came just 11 months after another, on Memorial Day 2015, that also crippled the city.

Together, the floods killed 16 people, inflicted well over

"I think what people are keenly interested in is making sure that there is a point person that they can direct their comments to," said Houston's Mayor, Sylvester Turner, noting the city "has never had a chief resilience officer.That indicates in and of itself a major commitment." But residents who have flooded say they're looking for more than that."We were in there, well, trapped." The storm that pummeled Hammond's modest brick home — nicknamed the "Tax Day" flood because it fell on the deadline to file federal income taxes — came just 11 months after another, on Memorial Day 2015, that also crippled the city.Together, the floods killed 16 people, inflicted well over $1 billion in damage and provoked an unprecedented uproar from Houstonians, some of whom are now suing the city over chronic flooding problems."I just don't think I can go through another flood." Many of Hansen's neighbors, who live in an area of Houston known as Memorial City, have had the same experience.They've flooded in 2009, 20, and none of them live in any known floodplain.Current standards that govern how and where developers and residents can build are mostly sufficient, they say.And all the recent monster storms are freak occurrences — not harbingers of global warming or a sign of things to come.

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"I think what people are keenly interested in is making sure that there is a point person that they can direct their comments to," said Houston's Mayor, Sylvester Turner, noting the city "has never had a chief resilience officer.

That indicates in and of itself a major commitment." But residents who have flooded say they're looking for more than that.

"We were in there, well, trapped." The storm that pummeled Hammond's modest brick home — nicknamed the "Tax Day" flood because it fell on the deadline to file federal income taxes — came just 11 months after another, on Memorial Day 2015, that also crippled the city.

Together, the floods killed 16 people, inflicted well over $1 billion in damage and provoked an unprecedented uproar from Houstonians, some of whom are now suing the city over chronic flooding problems.

"I just don't think I can go through another flood." Many of Hansen's neighbors, who live in an area of Houston known as Memorial City, have had the same experience.

They've flooded in 2009, 20, and none of them live in any known floodplain.

Current standards that govern how and where developers and residents can build are mostly sufficient, they say.

And all the recent monster storms are freak occurrences — not harbingers of global warming or a sign of things to come.

billion in damage and provoked an unprecedented uproar from Houstonians, some of whom are now suing the city over chronic flooding problems.

"I just don't think I can go through another flood." Many of Hansen's neighbors, who live in an area of Houston known as Memorial City, have had the same experience.

They've flooded in 2009, 20, and none of them live in any known floodplain.

Current standards that govern how and where developers and residents can build are mostly sufficient, they say.

And all the recent monster storms are freak occurrences — not harbingers of global warming or a sign of things to come.

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He spends much of his time consoling angry residents at community meetings and "making house calls." And he is pursuing smaller, cheaper, quick-hit projects.And a significant portion of buildings that flooded in the same time frame were not located in the "100-year" floodplain — the area considered to have a 1 percent chance of flooding in any given year — catching residents who are not required to carry flood insurance off-guard.Scientists say the Harris County Flood Control District, which manages thousands of miles of floodwater-evacuating bayous and helps enforce development rules, should focus more on preserving green space and managing growth. And they say everyone should plan for more torrential rainfall because of the changing climate.Of the astonishing frequency of huge floods the city has been getting, he said, "I don't think it's the new normal." He also criticized scientists and conservationists for being "anti-development." "They have an agenda ...their agenda to protect the environment overrides common sense," he said.